franklanguage: (trucknbus)
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] sabotabby at What we talk about when we talk about pockets
My favourite type of fashion rant—POCKETS!—and a nice way to test LJ's repost function and get back to posting things that aren't about tumors—Sabs

Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] cucumberseed at What we talk about when we talk about pockets
Originally posted by [livejournal.com profile] kylecassidy at What we talk about when we talk about pockets
This post is about pockets, feminism, design, autonomy and common sense. Please feel free to repost or link to it if you know people who'd benefit from the discussion.

A few weeks ago [livejournal.com profile] trillian_stars and I were out somewhere and she asked "Oooh, can I get a cup of coffee?" and I thought "why are you asking me? You don't need permission." But what I discovered was that her clothes had no pockets, so she had no money with her.

Mens clothes have pockets. My swimsuits have pockets. All of them do, and it's not unusual, because, what if you're swimming in the ocean and you find a fist full of pirate booty in the surf? You need somewhere to put it. Men are used to carrying stuff in their pockets, you put money there, you put car keys there. With money and car keys come power and independence. You can buy stuff, you can leave. The idea of some women's clothes not having pockets is baffling, but it's worse than that -- it's patriarchal because it makes the assumption that women will either carry a handbag, or they'll rely on men around them for money and keys and such things. (I noticed this also when Neil & Amanda were figuring out where her stuff had to go because she had no pockets.) Where do women carry tampons? Amanda wondered, In their boyfriend's pockets, Neil concluded.

I then noticed that none of [livejournal.com profile] trillian_stars' running clothes had pockets. Any pockets. Which is (as they always say on "Parking Wars") ridikulus. Who leaves the house with nothing? (It's not a rhetorical question, I actually can't think of anybody).

We fixed some of this by getting this runners wrist wallet from Poutfits on Etsy -- it holds money, ID, keys ... the sort of stuff you'd need. Plus you can wipe your nose on it. It solves the running-wear problem, but not the bigger problem.




Clickenzee to Embiggen!



The bigger problem is that people who design women's fashions are still designing pants and jackets that have no pockets. In fact, this jacket we got last December has ... no pockets. It's not a question of lines or shape, it's a question of autonomy.



Clickenzee to Embiggen



So I'm asking my friends who design women's clothes to consider putting pockets in them, they can be small, they can be out of the way, they can be inside the garment, but space enough to put ID, and cash and bus tokens. And maybe a phone. (And if you can design a surreptitious tampon stash, I'm sure Neil & Amanda & a lot of other people would appreciate it as well.)

(Posted by [livejournal.com profile] franklanguage: The very first designer I thought of was Eileen Fisher. Love her stuff, love how she's all about empowering "women and girls," but I have a lot of Eileen Fisher dresses with no pockets. Nada.

However, Jill Anderson is a designer that definitely "gets it." Practical, beautiful, comfortable clothes—that are cut for real women. Her signature parachute skirt has no pockets, but there's nowhere you could really put them in this design.)




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franklanguage: (Trip glasses)
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/10/fashion/MODEL.html?ref=fashion



I tweeted about this review just now, and got the reply, "Curious to what you think of the fashion spread? My feelings are mixed and complicated after seeing the photos."

Well, having been at or near the eye of the storm my entire life, I find it near-impossible to put into words. I read some comments, including a featured one that "Celebrating overweight women is just as bad as celebrating underweight ones." Well, considering that in the U.S., anyway, most women are overweight, it seems to be a sign of the times: deal with it, chick. She goes on: "Models ideally would be women who ate right, exercised regularly and managed their stress." I'm a vegan, I walk about ten miles a day or more, and I'm still overweight; I have been all my life. (But I have awesome thighs!) I wish someone would celebrate me.

I know the standard for as long as I've been alive has been tiny, thin, and waiflike, but fewer and fewer women look like that. In fact, the first article I ever read about Feral Cheryl, the Australian fashion doll, began with a little girl complaining, "Nobody looks like Barbie." It's a lot of work to look like Barbie, which is probably why so few women do anymore.
franklanguage: (Trip glasses)
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/10/fashion/MODEL.html?ref=fashion



I tweeted about this review just now, and got the reply, "Curious to what you think of the fashion spread? My feelings are mixed and complicated after seeing the photos."

Well, having been at or near the eye of the storm my entire life, I find it near-impossible to put into words. I read some comments, including a featured one that "Celebrating overweight women is just as bad as celebrating underweight ones." Well, considering that in the U.S., anyway, most women are overweight, it seems to be a sign of the times: deal with it, chick. She goes on: "Models ideally would be women who ate right, exercised regularly and managed their stress." I'm a vegan, I walk about ten miles a day or more, and I'm still overweight; I have been all my life. (But I have awesome thighs!) I wish someone would celebrate me.

I know the standard for as long as I've been alive has been tiny, thin, and waiflike, but fewer and fewer women look like that. In fact, the first article I ever read about Feral Cheryl, the Australian fashion doll, began with a little girl complaining, "Nobody looks like Barbie." It's a lot of work to look like Barbie, which is probably why so few women do anymore.
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I'm a dogwalker; every day is dress-down day.
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I'm a dogwalker; every day is dress-down day.
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