franklanguage: (Roseanne Rosanadana)
(from the New York Times Magazine:)
Eva Moskowitz and Bill de Blasio are two liberal crusaders with profoundly divergent ideas about how the mission of aiding the disempowered should be carried out.



Eva Moskowitz of Success Academy Charter Schools at a Harlem location in June.

Credit Benjamin Lowy/Reportage, for The New York Times


One afternoon this summer, Eva Moskowitz, who runs Success Academy Charter Schools, showed me her senior yearbook. “I was the editor,” she said. We sat in a half-furnished office at the construction site of her charter network’s first high school. A buzz saw shrieked in the background. She graduated in 1982 from Stuyvesant, the most selective of New York City’s public high schools. “I got completely engaged in how to take this sentimental book and make it a much bigger project.” She fought to publish photographs capturing the political protests of that time — against nuclear weapons, against American aid to the government in El Salvador. To go with the pictures, she wrote a manifesto, concluding: “We do not live in a vacuum.”

FEATURED COMMENT:
Eric Maine
Everything I have heard about her corporate educational fiefdom is disturbing, from cherry-picking students so as to improve scores, to worming their way into City buildings rent-free.

“It took will,” she said about her yearbook triumph, in a tone that was only somewhat self-mocking. Moskowitz recalled, as well, Stuyvesant’s intractable failings. With an outrage that seemed barely abated by time, she described an alcoholic physics teacher who dozed through class, ceding instruction to an especially talented student, and endemic cheating on exams, caught by the cameras of her yearbook staff. “I thought it was my moral duty to show” the evidence “to the administration,” she said. “They were very adamant that they would investigate. They didn’t.”

At 50, Moskowitz is petite and favors tailored suits and spiked heels. She founded her first Success Academy, a kindergarten and first grade in Harlem, in 2006 and has swiftly created the largest charter group in the city. It stretches from the South Bronx to Bedford-­Stuyvesant­, with nearly 9,500 students in 24 elementary schools, seven middle schools and the new high school, which opened in late August. Most students are black and Latino and poor enough to qualify for federally subsidized lunch — the kinds of children the city’s regular public-school system seems all but incapable of educating. Fewer than one-fifth of black students in the city can read or do math at grade level, to take just one grim statistic.

www.nytimes.com/2014/09/07/magazine/the-battle-for-new-york-schools-eva-moskowitz-vs-mayor-bill-de-blasio.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&version=HpSumSmallMediaHigh&module=second-column-region®ion=top-news&WT.nav=top-news&_r=0
franklanguage: (Default)
Yesterday (Sunday) there were a few downpours, and I got soaked in one:

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Eighth street and Sixth avenue, in case you're wondering;
the imposing building in the background of picture 3 is One Christopher street


I ducked into a niche [doorway with locked door] in the building where I was waiting for the bus, but it was too shallow. Fortunately my pack is waterproof—got to test that theory yesterday—and the piece of [vegan] blackout cake I was transporting home made it safely. (Half last night, half for breakfast.)

Before the rain, there was this:

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10th street and Avenue B


Of course, if I'd realized it was going to rain, I would have worn rain gear—Gore-Tex® hat, slicker, Sneads Ferry SneakersSneads Ferry Sneakers, but alas. No real harm done, and this was the only time this summer I got caught in the rain. Went home and dried off; no harm done.
franklanguage: (kathy_bates_eyeebrows)
Today was Go Topless day, a worldwide event, and a bunch of us lovelies met at Bryant Park to protest the disparity of treatment of topless men vs. topless women.

I don't know how the cut will go through from Dreamwidth to LiveJournal, so I just want to say some of the following images may be NSFW (but wouldn't be in a truly free society) so if you're likely to be offended or are at work, you might want to get away from this URL, or drape the monitor with a jacket or something.

Actually, for some reason the sort-of leader of this march met with a group of a few women at Bryant Park (40th street between 5th and 6th avenues), and stepped off toward Times Square around 12:15 PM; I got to the park around 12:30, which was the meeting time stated on the website. (I get that they were anxious to start, but it meant there were a few of us left behind, and might have made for a bigger rally if they had waited.)

There were, unfortunately or fortunately, more men with cameras than topless women. )

Importantly, there was a woman, Phoenix Feeley, at the rally who shared her story of (recent!) imprisonment for daring to sunbathe topless on a New Jersey beach. The publicity she received helped the length of her imprisonment to be cut—she was imprisoned for refusing to pay a fine of $816—but it's pretty abominable that she was jailed at all.



Never take your rights for granted; they can be taken away at any time.
franklanguage: (trucknbus)
IMG_0028

"I Met God, She's Black."

ROOFTOPSNYC.COM
franklanguage: (token)
I almost forgot about the Nostalgia Train; every December, the MTA runs some of its vintage 1940s and 1950s trains. (Of course, the trains actually ran from the 30s until the 70s.) Some of the cars have incandescent lights and ceiling fans, and most of them have improbable wicker seats.

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There was a swing dance party happening in the 2nd Avenue station; couples were cutting a rug accompanied by dance bands according to this schedule, and this couple was waiting for the Avenue A bus to take them down to the Delancey/Essex station to greet the train:

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Funny how the human mind works, because I had just been thinking about this train but forgotten when it was going to run again. Just goes to show you, New Yorkers don't need much of an excuse to turn anything into a party!

franklanguage: "it's not me it's you" button (notmeitsyou)
I guess the kids in the duplex apartment on the first floor of our building were fighting for their right to party last night. (Several years ago, the landlord renovated one of the back first-floor apartments to include the basement space directly under it; consequently, we always get a group of frat-like tenants occupying it.) It was the first really obnoxious party of the season and when it was getting close to midnight and they were still whooping and yelling, I started filling a bucket with water, with the intention of dumping it down on them if they didn't quiet down much after midnight.

I poured the first bucket on them around 12:15 and there were screams and "Aaaugh! Fücking cünt!" yelled up. They didn't get the message, so I threw down a few more buckets at various intervals. They kept on laughing and yelling each time, so finally when it was getting close to 1:30 I scooped some cat turds out of the litter box and poured them down. There was silence, although several minutes later my dog started going crazy about a noise out in the hall; apparently someone had run up the stairs to see what apartment the turds came from. I know they could have looked up to see which window the light was coming from, but even if they know they're not likely to complain to the building management.

Sorry, no pix; I realize if I had been out they could have kept going all night long, but I know this noise bothers other people too, and not just in our building. Why couldn't they take the party indoors?
franklanguage: (Roseanne Rosanadana)

The 4th Street Food Co-op from The Local East Village on Vimeo.



This is neat; a few NYU students made a film for their blog about the 4th Street Food Co-op, which I belong to. I was manager for a couple of years several years ago, and bailed when things got too rough. (People were missing shifts and I had to fill in for them at a moment's notice; then, we moved to a smaller, dirtier space down the block while our space was being renovated. I got burnt-out pretty fast.)

I've been back for about a year, and so far it's been great—no political tension like at the Park Slope co-op, but we have our own pet causes.
franklanguage: (bonfire)
So Bread and Puppet Theater is in town for their annual production at the Theater for the New City, and for the second year in a row I'm volunteering in both productions.




Peter Schumann is the director of Bread and Puppet; the troupe is going into its 40th season. Originally based in NYC, the theater was "exiled" (according to Peter) to a farm in Glover, Vermont several years ago, where the artists create, rehearse, and perform.



"Man = Carrot Circus" is the show that happens for Saturday and Sunday matinees; it involves the premise that an upright man rooted in dirt was created in the image of a carrot rooted in dirt. It's the family-themed show that uses local volunteers, including kids from all over.



"Attica" is the play being revived on the 40th anniversary of the Attica prison uprising; "Man of Flesh and Cardboard" is a play about the prisoner Bradley Manning, a prisoner incarcerated for supplying restricted material to WikiLeaks. He is accused of war crimes because he brought war crimes to the light of day.




I took all the pictures in rehearsal because unfortunately you're not allowed to take pictures in performances unless you're press.

[Except for this one, which I snuck: every year at the circus performance, Peter Schumann comes on at the end of the show as a twelve-foot Uncle Sam:]

franklanguage: (bonfire)
So Bread and Puppet Theater is in town for their annual production at the Theater for the New City, and for the second year in a row I'm volunteering in both productions.




Peter Schumann is the director of Bread and Puppet; the troupe is going into its 40th season. Originally based in NYC, the theater was "exiled" (according to Peter) to a farm in Glover, Vermont several years ago, where the artists create, rehearse, and perform.



"Man = Carrot Circus" is the show that happens for Saturday and Sunday matinees; it involves the premise that an upright man rooted in dirt was created in the image of a carrot rooted in dirt. It's the family-themed show that uses local volunteers, including kids from all over.



"Attica" is the play being revived on the 40th anniversary of the Attica prison uprising; "Man of Flesh and Cardboard" is a play about the prisoner Bradley Manning, a prisoner incarcerated for supplying restricted material to WikiLeaks. He is accused of war crimes because he brought war crimes to the light of day.




I took all the pictures in rehearsal because unfortunately you're not allowed to take pictures in performances unless you're press.

[Except for this one, which I snuck: every year at the circus performance, Peter Schumann comes on at the end of the show as a twelve-foot Uncle Sam:]

franklanguage: (token)



Bryan Close (above) is a photographer who lost his vending table when Mayor Bloomberg declared a war against artists and stripped artists of their First Amendment rights. The artists are currently in court against the city, but the case could take a long, long time.

Because artists who have set up tables—even ones with prominent signs saying "DISPLAY ONLY"—have been arrested and had all their work confiscated, Bryan has built himself a display to wear and carry on his shoulders. (Artists, apparently, aren't even allowed to have umbrellas or parasols at their stands because it brings the height of the display up above five feet.)

This wearable display is a great way to market his work, of course, because it creates interest, and as long as he keeps moving, he isn't violating any rules; after all, he isn't stationary. It must be exhausting on a hot day like today, though! His website is The Light Dynamic and it includes a blog.
franklanguage: (token)



Bryan Close (above) is a photographer who lost his vending table when Mayor Bloomberg declared a war against artists and stripped artists of their First Amendment rights. The artists are currently in court against the city, but the case could take a long, long time.

Because artists who have set up tables—even ones with prominent signs saying "DISPLAY ONLY"—have been arrested and had all their work confiscated, Bryan has built himself a display to wear and carry on his shoulders. (Artists, apparently, aren't even allowed to have umbrellas or parasols at their stands because it brings the height of the display up above five feet.)

This wearable display is a great way to market his work, of course, because it creates interest, and as long as he keeps moving, he isn't violating any rules; after all, he isn't stationary. It must be exhausting on a hot day like today, though! His website is The Light Dynamic and it includes a blog.
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